Book Review – The Book of Shamanic Healing

Book Review – The Book of Shamanic Healing

The Book of Shamanic Healing by Kristin Madden is a brilliant book which acts as an introduction to the age old practices of Shamanic healing. It peers beyond the mysterious shroud that veils this healing art and helps us to relate to it by narrating her personal experiences, what to expect, how things actually work and what not to expect.

 

Kristin Madden is a shaman herself, hailing from the Saami tradition of Finland and she has studied other shamanic traditions such as the Native American, Tibetan and Celtic traditions. She is extremely well versed in the various practices and is a person who seems to “walk the talk”.

 

The book is very GROUNDED, which I cannot say for many other books in this category

What I loved about this book is the way in which she has melded modern psychology with age old traditions. The book is very GROUNDED, which I cannot say for many other books in this category. It looks at the deeper psychological significance of each shamanic practice and talks about it as a “metaphysical science” rather than old beliefs. She highlights the significance of the “Wounded Healer” in all of us. If you were wounded, be it, emotional, spiritual or physical wounding and were able to heal yourself then you are a wounded healer. That wounding gave you a profound lesson and if you wish then you can facilitate healing with regards to those issues that you healed yourself from.

 

Kristin provides a holistic diagram of a “Healer’s Toolkit” that shamans have been using for aeons. This toolkit comprises of herbs, animals (various archetypes that different animals represent in shamanic cultures), breathwork, dreams, the drum, spells, divination and much more. She goes through each item in the toolkit and paints a picture of how it is used traditionally, what is the significance of the tool, how it actually works and how we can benefit from its use.

 

Throughout the book she has also created many exercises, such as – various meditations, creating a sacred space, energetically clearing and protecting the space, breathing exercises, wild plant walks, freeing fragments of our self, associating with our shadow elements and how to work with them, soul retrieval and extraction, exercises in developing compassion and much more.

 

The sections regarding our shadow self and its elements are especially enlightening. Your shadow self is that part of you which acts from the basis of all the hurt and the pain that you have experienced throughout your life. It is that part of you which makes you judge and hate people, which might make you feel depressed, lonely and unloved. Most “new age” books and self styled “gurus” completely ignore our shadow elements and brush it under the carpet of “positivity”. But shamanic traditions, steeped in the wisdom of our ancestors, actively seek to associate with and integrate our shadow self. That is the way of the grounded emotionalyst. No emotion is wrong, it is just different.

 

But shamanic traditions, steeped in the wisdom of our ancestors, actively seek to associate with and integrate our shadow self. That is the way of the grounded emotionalyst

I urge you to experience this fascinating book if you are interested in shamanic cultures, want to peek beyond its mysteries and utilize these effective tools in your daily lives, that have been tried and tested for aeons by our ancestors.


 

What do you think about this article? Please share your thoughts

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

The Working Man's Therapist

Ayan Mukherjee is a Toronto-based, Registered Psychotherapist (Q), specializing in EMDR Therapy, anxiety, low self-esteem, PTSD and men's issues. Contact him to book a free phone consultation -

Email: [email protected]

Phone: 416-854-2195

Clinic Location - Suite 507, 55 Eglinton Ave East, Toronto ON M4P 1G8

Read previous post:
Peace with your day job
5 Ways to Make Love to Your “Boring” Day Job

Not everyone is lucky or driven enough to be working in their dream job. It might lack passion, be dreary...

Close